How long can you be chased for a debt? - RCR Lawyers

How long can you be chased for a debt?

Have you ever wondered how long you can be chased for a debt or how long you have to recover your unpaid debts?

In most states in Australia, the limitation period for debts is for six (6) years, except in Northern Territory where it is for three (3) years.  This means that the creditor can pursue the debt from six (6) years from the date of when:

  1. The debt became due and payable; or
  2. The last date a payment was made towards the debt; or
  3. The date the debtor acknowledged in writing that they owed the debt.

It is imperative that you get the calculations correct, as failure to establish the limitation period, may mean that you will be unable to successfully recover your debt and the debt will become statute-barred.  

A statue-barred debt is when the debt becomes older than the limitation period in your State or Territory (being six (6) years in all states in Australia, except in Northern Territory where it is three (3) years).  Therefore, a creditor will no longer have legal right of recovery for a statue-barred debt. However, if the debtor acknowledges the debt in writing, or makes any payments towards the debt, then this resets the clock on the six (6) year limitation period.

Therefore, if you have any unpaid debt, we strongly suggest that you act fast, as the longer the time passes, the less chances you have of recovering the debt.

References:

Should you require any assistance in regards to unpaid debt, contact our debt recovery lawyers now to discuss your options in a no-obligation consultation with the experts. We will guide you, step by step and ensure the best possible outcome for your circumstances.  Call our Brisbane lawyers on (07) 3009 8444 or our Sydney lawyers on (02) 9307 8900. Alternatively, click here to get started.

The blog published by Rostron Carlyle Rojas is intended as general information only and is not legal advice on any subject matter. By viewing the blog posts, the reader understands there is no solicitor-client relationship between the reader and the blog publisher. The blog should not be used as a substitute for legal advice from a legal practitioner, and readers are urged to consult RCR on any legal queries concerning a specific situation.

 

Share Article:

Related Articles

June 24, 2022 |

Stay up to date with our latest articles